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Bazinet Realty
Linda G. Bazinet
Broker/Owner
47 Durfee Road
Dudley, MA 01571



Phone: 508-943-0667
Cell Phone: 508-864-2483
Email: Linda@BazinetRealty.com


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BUYERS INFORMATIONAL BLOG

A GREAT WAY TO FIND THAT PERFECT HOME!


If you are looking for a piece of property that you and your family can call home, there are a few important factors to consider beforehand. First, shopping for homes does not have to be difficult if you do it online. One way to do that is by using the “1000'S of Listings” link above. It will help you to find the perfect home in the area of your choice. You can also Sign up for “Request Listings Updates” that will email you every day with new listings, price changes, back on the market and open houses. You will have the ability to search the MLS and get the addresses of properties, view full listings sheet, show where the property is on a map, etc. You can keep the homes you like in a saved folder to view at anytime or email them to a friend or colleague.

This website also will allow you to sign up for MLS Property Messenger which will alert you of a new property as soon as it comes on the market. Be the first to know about new listings or price drops with the great service.

In the end, you and your family want to be as comfortable as possible in your new home, and so it is important that you find the perfect environment for your property. Once you begin shopping for homes, try to search for property that is located in a good area, and more importantly, the property should be close to your work and to your children's schools, as this in turn will ensure that commuting does not take too much out of your time. Do not focus on pricing alone, as this will limit your search. Instead, focus on how much room you are looking for, and make sure that these rooms are spacious enough so that no one feels crowded. Pricing can always be negotiated down the road, and you will find that if you negotiate a price on a home that you truly do like, then you will feel that you got a great deal. In the end, you and your family want to feel comfortable in your home, so it is important to begin your search on the right foot.


INFORMATION FOR BUYERS
Today’s real estate market presents some excellent opportunities whether it be for a single family home, multi-family homes, investment properties, condominium, property for sale, or a foreclosure home. Bazinet Realty provides exclusive Buyer Agent representation. A decline in housing market values and historically low interest rates has created a great buyers opportunity.

If in your search you find real estate properties for sale of interest, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer your real estate questions and provide you with the “home for sale” property address. We will even set up an appointment to view the properties for sale together at your convenience. So take advantage of searching the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) just like the Realtors do and when you are ready to buy a property, call a Realtor you can TRUST.


6 CREATIVE WAYS TO AFFORD A HOME

1. Investigate local, state, and national down payment assistance programs. These programs give qualified applicants loans or grants to cover all or part of your required down payment. National programs include the Nehemiah program, www.getdownpayment.com, and the American Dream Down Payment Fund from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, www.hud.gov.

2. Explore seller financing. In some cases, sellers may be willing to finance all or part of the purchase price of the home and let you repay them gradually, just as you would do with a mortgage.

3. Consider a shared-appreciation or shared-equity arrangement. Under this arrangement, your family, friends, or even a third-party may buy a portion of the home and share in any appreciation when the home is sold. The owner/occupant usually pays the mortgage, property taxes, and maintenance costs, but all the investors' names are usually on the mortgage. Companies are available that can help you find such an investor, if your family can’t participate.

4. Ask your family for help. Perhaps a family member will loan you money for the down payment or act as a co-signer for the mortgage. Lenders often like to have a co-signer if you have little credit history.

5. Lease with the option to buy. Renting the home for a year or more will give you the chance to save more toward your down payment. And in many cases, owners will apply some of the rental amount toward the purchase price. You usually have to pay a small, nonrefundable option fee to the owner.

6. Consider a short-term second mortgage. If you can qualify for a short-term second mortgage, this would give you money to make a larger down payment. This may be possible if you’re in good financial standing, with a strong income and little other debt.


GET YOUR FINANCES IN ORDER: To-Do List


1. Develop a household budget. Instead of creating a budget of what you’d like to spend, use receipts to create a budget that reflects your actual spending habits over the last several months. This approach will factor in unexpected expenses, such as car repairs, as well as predictable costs such as rent, utility bills, and groceries.

2. Reduce your debt. Lenders generally look for a total debt load of no more than 36 percent of income. This figure includes your mortgage, which typically ranges between 25 and 28 percent of your net household income. So you need to get monthly payments on the rest of your installment debt — car loans, student loans, and revolving balances on credit cards — down to between 8 and 10 percent of your net monthly income.

3. Look for ways to save. You probably know how much you spend on rent and utilities, but little expenses add up, too. Try writing down everything you spend for one month. You’ll probably spot some great ways to save, whether it’s cutting out that morning trip to Starbucks or eating dinner at home more often.

4. Increase your income. Now’s the time to ask for a raise! If that’s not an option, you may want to consider taking on a second job to get your income at a level high enough to qualify for the home you want.

5. Save for a down payment. Designate a certain amount of money each month to put away in your savings account. Although it’s possible to get a mortgage with only 5 percent down, or even less, you can usually get a better rate if you put down a larger percentage of the total purchase. Aim for a 20 percent down payment.

6. Keep your job. While you don’t need to be in the same job forever to qualify for a home loan, having a job for less than two years may mean you have to pay a higher interest rate.

7. Establish a good credit history. Get a credit card and make payments by the due date. Do the same for all your other bills, too. Pay off the entire balance promptly.


8 TIPS TO GUIDE YOU IN YOUR HOME SEARCH
1. Research before you look. Decide what features you most want to have in a home, what neighborhoods you prefer, and how much you’d be willing to spend each month for housing.

2. Be realistic. It’s OK to be picky, but don’t be unrealistic with your expectations. There’s no such thing as a perfect home. Use your list of priorities as a guide to evaluate each property.

3. Get your finances in order. Review your credit report and be sure you have enough money to cover your down payment and closing costs. Then, talk to a lender and get prequalified for a mortgage. This will save you the heartache later of falling in love with a house you can’t afford.

4. Don’t ask too many people for opinions. It will drive you crazy. Select one or two people to turn to if you feel you need a second opinion, but be ready to make the final decision on your own.

5. Decide your moving timeline. When is your lease up? Are you allowed to sublet? How tight is the rental market in your area? All of these factors will help you determine when you should move.

6. Think long term. Are you looking for a starter house with plans to move up in a few years, or do you hope to stay in this home for a longer period? This decision may dictate what type of home you’ll buy as well as the type of mortgage terms that will best suit you.

7. Insist on a home inspection. If possible, get a warranty from the seller to cover defects for one year.

8. Get help from a REALTOR®. Hire a real estate professional who specializes in buyer representation. Unlike a listing agent, whose first duty is to the seller, a buyer’s representative is working only for you. Buyer’s reps are usually paid out of the seller’s commission payment.


TIPS FOR LOWERING HOMEOWNER'S INSURANCE COSTS
1. Review the Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) report on the property you’re interested in buying. CLUE reports detail the property’s claims history for the most recent five years, which insurers may use to deny coverage. Make the sale contingent on a home inspection to ensure that problems identified in the CLUE report have been repaired.

2. Seek insurance coverage as soon as your offer is approved. You must obtain insurance to buy. And you don’t want to be told at closing that the insurer has denied your coverage.

3. Maintain good credit. Insurers often use credit-based insurance scores to determine premiums.

4. Buy your home owners and auto policies from the same company and you’ll usually qualify for savings. But make sure the discount really yields the lowest price.

5. Raise your deductible. If you can afford to pay more toward a loss that occurs, your premiums will be lower. Avoid making claims under $1,000.

6. Ask about other discounts. For example, retirees who tend to be home more than full-time workers may qualify for a discount on theft insurance. You also may be able to obtain discounts for having smoke detectors, a burglar alarm, or dead-bolt locks.

7. Seek group discounts. If you belong to any groups, such as associations or alumni organizations, they may have deals on insurance coverage.

8. Review your policy limits and the value of your home and possessions annually. Some items depreciate and may not need as much coverage.

9. Investigate a government-backed insurance plan. In some high-risk areas, federal or state government may back plans to lower rates. Ask your agent.

10. Be sure you insure your house for the correct amount. Remember, you’re covering replacement cost, not market value.


MOVING TIPS

EIGHT WEEKS BEFORE

• Remove unnecessary items from your attic, basement, storage shed, etc. Use things you can't move, such as frozen foods and cleaning supplies.
• Obtain information about your new community.
• Secure a floor plan of your new residence and decide what household items you want to keep.
• Start a possessions inventory.
• Solicit estimates from at least three moving companies.
• Call your homeowners insurance agent to find out to what degree your move is covered.
• Create a file for documenting all moving papers and receipts.
• Arrange to transfer your children's school records.

SIX WEEKS BEFORE

• Contact the IRS and/or your CPA for tax-deductible information.
• Evaluate your possessions inventory. Can you donate anything? Do you need it all?
• Notify your friends, relatives, professionals, creditors, subscriptions, etc.
• Subscribe to a local paper in your new community and familiarize yourself with local government, community and social news and activities.
• Begin the off-site storage process (if applicable).
• Locate high-quality health-care professionals and hospitals in your new location.
• Complete post-office change of address cards for the following: banks; charge cards; religious organizations; doctors/dentist; relatives and friends; income tax bureau/Social Security Administration/union; insurance broker/lawyer/CPA/stockbroker; magazines; post office; and schools.
• Clean your closets.
• Hold a moving/garage sale or donate items to charities.
• Choose a mover. Contact your mover to make arrangements and inquire about insurance coverage.
• If relocating due to a job, contact your employer to see what costs, if any, they will cover.

FOUR WEEKS BEFORE

• Start packing!
• Send furniture, drapes and carpets for repair/cleaning as needed.
• Gather auto licensing and registration documents, medical, dental and school records, birth certificates, wills, deeds, stock and other financial documentation, etc.
• Contact gas, electric, oil, water, telephone, cable TV and trash collection companies for service disconnect /connect at your old and new addresses. Also ask for final readings.
• Request refunds on unused homeowner's insurance, security deposit with landlord, and prepaid cable/internet service.
• Notify your gardener, snow removal service and pool service (if applicable).
• Contact insurance companies (auto, homeowner's, medical and life) to arrange for coverage in your new home.

THREE WEEKS BEFORE

• Make your travel plans.
• Arrange to close current bank accounts and open accounts in your new locale (if necessary).
• Notify your state's motor vehicle bureau of your new address.
• Arrange for childcare on moving day.

TWO WEEKS BEFORE

• Arrange special transport for your pets and plants.
• Service your car for the trip.
• Contact your moving company and review arrangements for your move.

ONE WEEK BEFORE

• Prepare detailed directions and an itinerary with emergency numbers for your moving company.
• Settle outstanding bills with local retailers. Pick up dry cleaning, and return library books and rented videotapes.
• Take pets to the veterinarian and get copies of their records.
• Drain gas and oil from power equipment.
• Give away plants not being moved.
• Cancel newspaper delivery.
• Buy two-weeks worth of medication and have your prescriptions forwarded to your new pharmacy.
• Buy traveler's checks.
• Make arrangements to pay for your move.

TWO TO THREE DAYS BEFORE

• If you're not doing it yourself, have your mover pack.
• Defrost refrigerators and freezers.
• Consider gathering all valuables and giving them to family or friends to hold until the move is completed.
• Disconnect all major appliances.
• Contact your moving company for any updates.
• Pack first-night items and a survival kit. Keep them in separate boxes in your car. First night items may include: sheets, towels, toiletries, phone, alarm clock, change of clothes and flashlight.
• Mover's survival kit may include: scissors, utility knife, coffee cups, instant coffee/tea or a coffee maker, water and soft drinks, snacks, paper plates, plastic utensils, paper towels, toilet paper, soap, pencils and paper, local phone book, masking and/or duct tape, trash bags, shelf liner and aspirin or ibuprofen.

MOVING DAY

• Be home to answer any questions your mover may have.
• Record all utility meter readings (gas, electric and water).
• Stay until your movers are finished.
• Complete information on the bill and carefully read the document and the inventory sheet before signing it.
• Keep your copies of the bill and inventory until your possessions are delivered, the charges are paid and any claims are settled.
• Take one final look around to see if you forgot anything.
• Give movers the directions to your new home, and an emergency number where you can be reached during the move.

AT DESTINATION

• Unpack first-night items and mover's survival kit.
• Be at the destination to welcome the movers and be on hand to answer any questions.
• After the job is completed, pay what is owed. The driver is obligated by law (a federal requirement for interstate moves) to collect payment upon delivery.
• Scrutinize the unloading of your items and account for each one on your inventory sheet. Check promptly and carefully for any damaged or missing items.
• Place moving and other important documents in a safe place.
• Go to the post office and collect held mail.


THE HOME INSPECTION: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

When you are buying a home the costs really add up and you may start thinking about where you can save money. One question that many buyers ask is do I need a home inspection?

Most often the answer to the question is yes! A home inspection is an objective examination of the home and its systems. The inspection covers the entire house from the roof to the foundation.

A home inspection will cover the home's foundation, basement, structural components, roof, attic, insulation, walls, ceilings, floors windows and doors. It will also examine the heating system, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems.

Because a home is often the largest single investment you will ever make it is important to know as much as you can about the home before you buy it. A home inspection will help you identify any needed repairs as well as what is needed to regularly maintain the home. The home inspection will help you proceed with the purchase with confidence.

When choosing a home inspector cost shouldn't be your first consideration. Look for the inspector's qualifications, experience, training and compliance with state regulations.

Remember, that no house is perfect. There are bound to be issues with almost any home use the information to decide if the house is right for you.



HOW TO FIND A QUALIFIED HOME INSPECTOR

A home is a very big purchase in your life and one of the most important things you can do before you buy your new home. It can be difficult to find a qualified home inspector. You will want to make sure to do your homework before paying for a home inspection. Here are some tips to help you get on the right track and finding the right home inspector.

Ask for opinions.
Ask your friends and your real estate agent who they recommend who have had an inspection recently. You can also ask the inspector for references. Word of mouth is always a great way to find a reliable professional.

Check with your lender
Some lenders or loan types require a certain type of inspection. You will want to make sure your inspector qualifies and you obtain the necessary type of inspection.

Ask what the inspection covers
No two home inspections are the same so you will want to be sure to know what you are paying for. Ask questions like:
•What systems are covered in the home inspection?
•Are there some services that require an extra fee?
•Ask for an example or outline of the inspection report.

Ask for a resume or background questions
•Where was the inspector trained?
•Does he or she attend continuing education classes?
•Does the inspector belong to a professional organization?
If so, what are the requirements for membership? Entry should require more than just an application fee.
•Does the inspector carry Errors & Omissions insurance? This type of malpractice insurance may come in handy if the inspector overlooks a major problem.


At the inspection
A home inspection is not only a time to find the potential pitfalls it can also be a time to learn about your new home. Make sure to attend the inspection yourself. Witnessing problems first-hand will give you a better grasp of the home.


WHAT'S IN YOUR WATER?
Not that long ago, most people didn't think twice before grabbing a glass, and filling it up with tap water from their kitchen sink. But in the past few years, concerns over water quality have prompted people to look for safer alternatives. While some regions are plagued with tap water having a "bad taste" (usually due to water treatment agents like chlorine), other areas have more serious issues to deal with, like bacteria proliferation and industrial pollutants. While some people don't mind the cost of purchasing bottled water, others have tried to be more economical, installing water filters on their tap faucets, or in many cases, outfitting large, expensive water filtration systems for their entire house. By understanding your family's water needs, and doing a quick bit of research, you'll be able to get a better idea of the quality of water in your area, and the steps you can take to ensure your family's safety.

1. Do your research - Sites like http://water.usgs.gov and http://water.epa.gov/drink/ compile up-to-date statistics on a wide variety of water measurements in your area.

2. Look into cost - If you find yourself living in an area where the tap water consistently receives low marks, then it just makes good sense for you to explore your water filtration options. While there are many options to choose from, it really boils down to your peace of mind.

Water Filtration Pitchers - The classic Brita pitcher is what usually comes to mind for most, but there are actually quite a few of these types of water filtration systems on the market now. And while they are definitely the most convenient kind of water filtration system, many don't offer the same guarantees as some of the more advanced systems you have the option of choosing from. Not to say that these simple fill-and-pour systems should be overlooked, though. These pitchers are great for areas that have those "bad taste" kind of water issues. In these areas, many people are content with just a pitcher. However, you will have to buy replacement filters on a regular basis, and that often overlooked expense can leave many regretting that they didn't just spend the money on a bigger system.

Faucet Filters - These come in two varieties. One variety attaches to your actual faucet, and the other is installed under the sink, purifying the water before it reaches the faucet. Each have their pros and cons, but most of them are better equipped to remove a wider variety of contaminants than the classic water filtration pitcher. If you live in an area where hard water is a problem, many of these undersink varieties offer water softening options as well. These systems are ideal for people who are looking to only purify their sink water. Installing one of these in your kitchen will give your family superb drinking water, while providing you crisp, clean water for cooking purposes.

Whole House Water Filters - These are attached at the "point of entry" water source of your house, and will filter all of your home's water, from the shower to the ice maker. Many people find that this option is the best, as all of their water quality concerns have the capability of being met by only one filter. These systems require the least amount of maintenance, but have the heaviest price tag out of all of the systems outlined thus far. If you have municipal (city) water, then a decent whole house water filtration system will cost you an average of 700 dollars or more, and well water systems can set you back into the thousands. However, this is the best way to ensure that all of the water flowing into your home is safe, soft, and tasty.

For more information on the kinds of water systems available to you, please visit http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/water-filters/buying-guide.htm


LUCKY HOUSE NUMBERS
Many people think seven is a lucky number but if you are looking to get the most bang for your buck the number you want in your address is an eight.

According to a study done by the University of British Columbia, houses and street numbers ending in eight sold at a 2.5 per cent higher rate than homes and street numbers ending with any other digits. In fact, the study also found homes and street numbers ending in four sold at a 2.2 per cent discount.

House numbers have recently become more important with the influx of Chinese buyers in the marketplace and the increasing popularity of Feng Shui. Numbers that sound similar to Chinese words that have positive meanings are believed to be lucky. The number eight sounds similar to the word for prosper or wealth. The fear of the number four, or tetraphobia, is because the pronunciation of the word for four is similar to the word for death in Mandarin, Cantonese and several Chinese dialects.

Thinking of rolling the dice on the number 13? Many large casino hotels in Las Vegas omit floor numbers 4, 14, 24, 34 and 40 to 49. The number 13 is not however, considered unlucky in the Chinese tradition.

Other numbers with perceived good luck are two, three, five and seven. Two because of the Chinese saying good things come in pairs. The number three sounds similar to birth and the number five is associated with the five elements (water, wood, fire, earth and metal). Considered the luckiest number in the West, 7 symbolizes togetherness.

Even though house numbers may influence a buying decision there is no evidence to support actual bad or good luck in homes with certain numbers. The thought of good or bad luck has more to do with the psychology of people than actual events.


CHEMICAL FREE HOMES

Did you know that indoor air pollution is actually worse than outdoor air pollution? Indoor pollution can in fact be 2 to 10 times worse depending on the materials in your home. Many of the materials in your home omit Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's). According to the EPA, VOC's are in the air that you breathe and can have long term health effects, including liver, kidney and central nervous system damage and cancer.

Here is a list of some of the indoor air pollutants that you may want to reduce or remove in order to have a healthier home.

Cleaning Supplies
The things that clean your home may be making you sick. In fact, bleach is one of the biggest offenders. In order to have a truly clean home, remove all of these chemicals and start replacing them with natural ones. Check the labels of everything. Many sheets that are made for your dryer have formaldehyde in them. Some of the most dangerous cleaning products are corrosive drain cleaners, oven cleaners, and acidic toilet bowl cleaners. Corrosive chemicals can cause severe burns on eyes, skin and, if ingested, on the throat and esophagus.

Air Fresheners
Air fresheners may smell sweet but their effect can be anything but. Some air fresheners can send chemicals into the air that contain VOCs. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology looked at plug-in fresheners and found more than 20 VOCs' and more than one-third were considered toxic or hazardous. VOCs can increase the risk of asthma in kids. At high enough levels, they can also irritate the eyes and lungs, trigger dizziness and headaches, and even lead to memory loss.

Furniture
Believe it or not the place where you sit or sleep could be harming your health. Furniture is such a big part of our life, we eat on it, sleep and sit on it. Furniture also can emit VOCs. Furniture is often made with flame retardants, finishes, adhesives and foam cushions that give off harmful chemicals.

Paint
You often hear about the dangers of lead paint. You should also be worried about the brand new fresh paint you just put on the walls. Paint, paint strippers, varnish removers and floor stains all emit VOC's into the air. These chemicals don't go away once the paint has dried or once it stops smelling. The harmful chemicals can last for as long as two years.

New Flooring
That new carpet smell is not good for you. As pretty as it may look new carpet, wood floors or even linoleum flooring give off VOCs. Purchase flooring produced from renewable materials such as linseed oil, rosins, wood flour and jute. Look for wood flooring that is FSC Certified (it came from a Forest Stewardship Council Certified Forest which helps protect old growth forests from being clear cut).

For more information read about Sources of Indoor Air Pollution on the EPA site.


REAL ESTATE LINGO
Sometimes reading the description of a home for sale can be like trying to interpret a foreign language. Some of the information is pretty straightforward but often agents use acronyms or other abbreviations to describe a home and that can leave a potential buyer confused.

Here are a few of some more common acronyms or abbreviations that you may see:

A/C: Air conditioned
ATT: Attached
BSMT: Basement
C/Air: Central Air
C/Vac: Central Vac
CRNR: Corner
EIK: eat-in kitchen
FROG: family room over the garage—extra space!
HWF or HW: hardwood floors
LA: Living Area
MBR: Master Bedroom
REF: Refrigerator
SF or s/f: square feet or foot
SS: stainless steel (as in any kitchen appliance)
Vu: view(s)
WBFP: wood-burning fireplace
W/D: washer/dryer
WIC: walk-in closet

Can you think of any more acronyms?


A GREAT WAY TO FIND THAT PERFECT HOME
If you are looking for a piece of property that you and your family can call home, there are a few important factors to consider beforehand. First, shopping for homes does not have to be difficult if you do it online. One way to do that is by using the “Search Properties” link above. It will help you to find the perfect home in the area of your choice. You can also Sign up for “New Listings Email Alerts” that will email you every day with new listings, price changes, back on the market and open houses. You will have the ability to search the MLS and get the addresses of properties, view full listings sheet, show where the property is on a map, etc. You can keep the homes you like in a saved folder to view at anytime or email them to a friend or colleague.

This website also will allow you to sign up for MLS Property Messenger which will alert you of a new property as soon as it comes on the market. Be the first to know about new listings or price drops with the great service.

In the end, you and your family want to be as comfortable as possible in your new home, and so it is important that you find the perfect environment for your property. Once you begin shopping for homes, try to search for property that is located in a good area, and more importantly, the property should be close to your work and to your children's schools, as this in turn will ensure that commuting does not take too much out of your time. Do not focus on pricing alone, as this will limit your search. Instead, focus on how much room you are looking for, and make sure that these rooms are spacious enough so that no one feels crowded. Pricing can always be negotiated down the road, and you will find that if you negotiate a price on a home that you truly do like, then you will feel that you got a great deal. In the end, you and your family want to feel comfortable in your home, so it is important to begin your search on the right foot.


ARE YOU A BAD BORROWER?
Getting approved for a loan isn't always a good thing. You have to make sure you are a good borrower. What makes a bad borrower? There are several types of loans you should avoid if you don't want to overextend yourself and potentially damage your credit rating.

Payday loans Interest rates on pay day loans often run high into the triple digits. They are designed to be extremely short-term. Pay day loans often put borrowers in a cycle of debt that can be difficult to break because borrower usually can't pay off the original loans and keep returning to the service.

Car title loans Borrowing against an asset is usually never a good idea. Most car title loans charge interest with an annual percentage rate of well over a 100 percent and they are generally due within one month. If the borrower can't pay back the loan, the lender will take your car and sell it.

Tax refund anticipation loans Another loan with an extremely high interest rate is a tax refund anticipation loan. If you need more money you can change the amount that's withheld from your paycheck. That way you give yourself a raise and the government takes only the amount that's owed.

Co-signing a loan Co-signing a loan for someone else has you taking on all of the responsibility of another financial obligation with none of the benefits. Too often co-signers find themselves left with the loan long after the other person on the loan has stopped paying. It usually never makes sense to take on someone else's debt.


   
Committed to Professionalism in Real Estate.
Massachusetts Licensed Real Estate Brokerage located in Dudley, Massachusetts


Servicing: Auburn, Barre, Brimfield, Brookfield, Charlton, Douglas, Dudley, East Brookfield, Grafton, Hardwick, Holden, Holland, Leicester, Mendon, Millbury, Monson, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Northbridge, Oakham, Oxford, Palmer, Paxton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sturbridge-Fiskdale, Sutton, Uxbridge, Wales, Ware, Warren, Webster, West Boylston, West Brookfield, Worcester